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Statistical processing

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Personal Finances and Welfare, Health Statistics
Anne-Sofie Dam Bjørkman
+45 39 17 36 16

asd@dst.dk

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Hospitalization

Data are from the National Hospital Discharge Register and are received annually. Information is applied about admissions to, outpatient treatments at and emergency room visits to public somatic hospital wards during the calendar year. If a person is transferred during a hospital stay from one hospital ward to another, this will count as two admissions. The number of bed days in connection with admissions is applied. Accordingly, the units in the statistics are persons, admissions and bed days, outpatient treatments and emergency room visits. The statistics are broken down by sex, age, diagnosis, region of residence and a number of background variables: family type, occupational group, education, type of accommodation, ancestry and job function. (Up to and including 2008, the statistics were also broken down by predominant social security benefit).

Source data

External sources:

· The National Hospital Discharge Register, Sundhedsdatastyrelsen (the Danish Health Data Agency) (from 2012-2015 from SSI and before 2012 from the Danish Health Authority)

Internal sources:

· The Population Statistics Register · The Income Register · The Employment Classification Module · The Education Classification Module · The Buildings and Dwellings Statistics Register

Internal sources up to and including 2008:

· The register of transfer payments, see the statistics documentation for Interconnecting Social Statistics (discontinued) under the subject group Living conditions, Persons receiving public benefits.

Frequency of data collection

Annually.

Data collection

Register. Extracts from the master tables of the National Hospital Discharge Register in the Danish Health Data Agency are transmitted via a secure connection to Statistics Denmark.

Data validation

Statistics Denmark compares the received data with data from the previous year and any major variations are investigated. If we observe any seeming errors, we contact the Danish Health Data Agency for the purpose of clarification. We also assess the internal data, and in cases of doubt we contact the person in charge of the statistics for further explanation.

Data compilation

In the Hospitalisation Statistics Register, the following information exists for any person who has resided in Denmark during a calendar year about the person’s admissions to hospital:

  • The person’s dominant diagnosis in relation to groupings in the classification of diseases: the 23 grouping and the 99 grouping. (The dominant diagnosis is defined as the diagnosis due to which the person has spent most days in hospital in the calendar year).
  • The two groupings (the 23 grouping and the 99 grouping) are Danish so-called short lists of the WHO’s International Classification of Diseases, version 10.
  • The number of admissions and the number of bed days within four main groups of admission reasons: own disease, healthy companion (discontinued as from 2002), pregnancy/birth and examinations/preventive measures
  • The number of outpatient treatments
  • The number of emergency room visits
  • The person’s total number of different diagnoses according to the S list (up to and including 2005)
  • The number of bed days with dominant diagnosis according to the 23 grouping (up to and including 2005) and the S list
  • Information as to whether the person has been admitted in the last 4 years and if so for which admission reasons (up to and including 2005) .

In the Hospitalisation Statistics Register, the following information is available for each admission during the calendar year:

  • Admission and discharge dates for admissions, outpatient treatments and emergency room visits respectively
  • Type of admission, i.e. emergency or planned admission
  • Type of discharge for emergency room visits
  • The key diagnosis grouped in accordance with the 23 grouping and the S list (99 grouping)
  • Duration of the stay (bed days)
  • Codes indicating the hospital and the ward to which the admission took place (up to and including 2005)
  • Contact reason indicating whether the contact is due to disease, accident, violence etc. For admissions, the variable exists up to and including 2005. The variable does not exist for outpatient treatments.
  • In case the admission is caused by an accident, information is available about the circumstances of the accident (up to and including 2005)
  • Number of days since any previous admission in the year (up to and including 2005).

The method of calculation of the number of outpatient treatments is the number of visits in the year, and if the same person has several visits on the same day, this is only counted as one treatment.

Type of discharge for emergency room visits:

  • The key diagnosis grouped in accordance with the 23 grouping and the S list (99 grouping)
  • Duration of the stay (bed days)
  • Codes indicating the hospital and the ward to which the admission took place (up to and including 2005)
  • Contact reason indicating whether the contact is due to disease, accident, violence etc. For admissions, the variable exists up to and including 2005. The variable does not exist for outpatient treatments.
  • In case the admission is caused by an accident, information is available about the circumstances of the accident (up to and including 2005)
  • Number of days since any previous admission in the year (up to and including 2005).

The assessments include an index (illustration of the concept admission rate) which is defined as the share of a given population group that has been hospitalised. Age standardisation is applied for a number of the assessments, since the hospitalisation rate varies strongly with age. As from 2000, further standardisation is made as far as adults are concerned for socio-economic grouping and as far as children are concerned for the families’ educational level.

Adjustment

Not relevant for these statistics